Science

  • Skin patch could painlessly deliver vaccines, cancer medications in one minute
    on August 25, 2019 at 4:07 PM

    Melanoma is a deadly form of skin cancer that has been increasing in the U.S. for the past 30 years. Nearly 100,000 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed every year, and 20 Americans die every day from it, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. Now, researchers have developed a fast-acting skin patch that efficiently delivers medication to attack melanoma cells. The device, tested in mice and human skin samples, is an advance toward developing a vaccine to treat melanoma and has […]

  • Chocolate muddles cannabis potency testing
    on August 25, 2019 at 4:05 PM

    In 2012, Washington and Colorado became the first states to legalize recreational marijuana. Since then, several other states have joined them, and cannabis-infused edibles, including gummy bears, cookies and chocolates, have flooded the market. But these sweet treats have created major headaches for the scientists trying to analyze them for potency and contaminants. Researchers now report that components in chocolate might be interfering with cannabis potency testing, leading to inaccurate […]

  • Global appetite for beef, soy fuels Amazon fires
    on August 25, 2019 at 3:54 PM

    Two of the industries involved in the infernos consuming the Amazon rainforest and drawing the attention of global powers gathered at the G7 meeting in France are familiar to diners worldwide: soy and beef.

  • Ivory Coast's 'Floating Island' points to greener tourism
    on August 25, 2019 at 3:54 PM

    The seaside resort offers visitors a cool drink or tasty meal, a dip in a pool, a karaoke session or an overnight stay, all with a view.

  • Brazil's army fights Amazon fires after hundreds more flare up
    on August 25, 2019 at 3:53 PM

    Brazil on Sunday deployed two C-130 Hercules aircraft to douse fires devouring parts of the Amazon rainforest, as hundreds of new blazes were ignited ahead of nationwide protests over the destruction.

  • 'Red lights' as over-tourism threatens Corsican nature reserve
    on August 25, 2019 at 3:53 PM

    "It's nature's magical design," says a tourist guide, waxing poetic as he comments on the impressive red cliffs plunging into a turquoise sea at the Scandola nature reserve on France's Corsica island.

  • Docking aborted for Russia's first humanoid robot in space
    on August 25, 2019 at 3:49 PM

    An unmanned spacecraft carrying Russia's first humanoid robot to be sent into orbit failed to dock at the International Space Station on Saturday, in a new setback for Moscow.

  • CITES votes to protect endangered mako sharks
    on August 25, 2019 at 3:48 PM

    A proposal to strengthen protection for mako sharks, hunted for their meat and fins, was adopted Sunday by 102 countries at the CITES global wildlife trade summit.

  • Astronomer: 'Magic' nights make Hawaii best telescope site
    on August 25, 2019 at 3:47 PM

    When starlight from billions of years ago zips across the universe and finally comes into focus on Earth, astronomers want their telescopes to be in the best locations possible to see what's out there.

  • NASA investigating first crime committed in space: report
    on August 25, 2019 at 3:46 PM

    US space agency NASA is investigating what may be the first crime committed in outer space, The New York Times reported Saturday.

  • How diabetes can increase cancer risk
    on August 25, 2019 at 4:00 AM

    For years, scientists have been trying to solve a medical mystery: Why do people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing some forms of cancer? Today, researchers report a possible explanation for this double whammy. They found that DNA sustains more damage and gets fixed less often when blood sugar levels are high, thereby increasing cancer risk. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition.

  • Skin patch could painlessly deliver vaccines, cancer medications in one minute
    on August 25, 2019 at 4:00 AM

    Nearly 100,000 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed annually, and 20 Americans die every day from it. Now, researchers have developed a skin patch that efficiently delivers medication within one minute to attack melanoma cells. The device, tested in mice and human skin samples, also could be adapted to deliver other vaccines. The scientists present their findings today at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition.

  • Chocolate muddles cannabis potency testing
    on August 25, 2019 at 4:00 AM

    Since the first states legalized recreational marijuana in 2012, several others have joined them, and cannabis-infused edibles, including gummy bears, cookies and chocolates, have flooded the market. But these sweet treats have created confusing results for scientists trying to analyze their potency and purity. Now researchers report that components in chocolate might be interfering with cannabis potency testing. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society Fall […]

  • How an old oven became a sink
    by Cari Shane on August 24, 2019 at 6:30 PM

    When DIY inspiration strikes, you’ve got to go with it. For me, that meant impulsively salvaging a rusty, musty, 1940s electric oven with a vague plan to turn it into a vanity and sink. It also sometimes means bringing in some help, which is how an auto mechanic ended up using body shop techniques on a kitchen appliance destined for a bathroom.

  • Why you might want to sign up for YouTube Premium
    by David Nield on August 24, 2019 at 1:30 PM

    Adding YouTube Premium to your growing list of digital subscriptions might have never crossed your mind. After all, YouTube already lets you watch millions of videos and upload as many videos as you want without paying a dime. Ever.

  • What's Mars solar conjunction, and why does it matter?
    on August 24, 2019 at 6:03 AM

    The daily chatter between antennas here on Earth and those on NASA spacecraft at Mars is about to get much quieter for a few weeks.

  • Worst drought in decades hits Chile capital and outskirts
    on August 24, 2019 at 5:57 AM

    Officials in Chile say the capital city and its outskirts are suffering from the worst drought in many years.

  • A novel technology for genome-editing a broad range of mutations in live organisms
    on August 24, 2019 at 5:57 AM

    The ability to edit genes in living organisms offers the opportunity to treat a plethora of inherited diseases. However, many types of gene-editing tools are unable to target critical areas of DNA, and creating such a technology has been difficult as living tissue contains diverse types of cells.

  • Migrating mule deer don't need directions: study
    on August 24, 2019 at 5:55 AM

    How do big-game animals know where to migrate across hundreds of miles of vast Wyoming landscapes year after year?

  • Deducing the scale of tsunamis from the 'roundness' of deposited gravel
    on August 24, 2019 at 4:00 AM

    Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University and Ritsumeikan University have found a link between the 'roundness' distribution of tsunami deposits and how far tsunamis reach inland. They sampled the 'roundness' of gravel from different tsunamis in Koyadori, Japan, and found a common, abrupt change in composition approximately 40% of the 'inundation distance' from the shoreline, regardless of tsunami magnitude. Estimates of ancient tsunami size from geological deposits may help inform effective […]

  • The environmental impact of watching a movie might surprise you
    by Sara Chodosh on August 23, 2019 at 10:00 PM

    You know it takes energy drive a car to the rental store, but what about ordering one in the mail—or streaming?

  • Last week in tech: The supreme smartphone, Apple's credit card, and Android 10
    by Stan Horaczek on August 23, 2019 at 9:19 PM

    Use your Apple Card to buy a terrible Supreme cellphone.

  • Essential travel kits for active pets
    by PopSci Commerce Team on August 23, 2019 at 8:37 PM

    Sweet travel accessories to make a trip with your pet way easier.

  • Three power adapters for every world traveler's suitcase
    by Tony Vaz on August 23, 2019 at 8:19 PM

    Make sure you’re armed with the right adapter wherever you roam.

  • The causes and risks of the Amazon fires
    on August 23, 2019 at 8:10 PM

    Fires have been breaking out at an unusual pace in Brazil this year, causing global alarm over deforestation in the Amazon region. The world's largest rainforest is often called the "lungs of the earth." Here's a look at what's happening:

  • Scientists explore outback as testbed for Mars
    on August 23, 2019 at 8:07 PM

    This week, scientists from NASA's upcoming Mars 2020 mission joined their counterparts from the joint European-Russian ExoMars mission in an expedition to the Australian Outback, one of the most remote, arid regions on the planet. Both teams came to hone their research techniques before their missions launch to the Red Planet next summer in search of signs of past life on Mars.

  • 10 most powerful animal bites on the planet
    by Steven Hill/Field and Stream on August 23, 2019 at 7:30 PM

    Nature’s strongest jaws often belong to apex predators who sit comfortably atop the food chain, and collecting hard data on the force of their bites can be a decidedly risky proposition.

  • Air mattresses that don't hate your back
    by Tony Vaz on August 23, 2019 at 7:22 PM

    If you’re hosting guests or hitting the road yourself, don't waste your time with those lesser air mattresses. Spines everywhere will thank you.

  • Western states oppose plan to charge for US reservoir water
    on August 23, 2019 at 6:32 PM

    Attorneys general from a dozen western states want the Trump administration to halt a proposal by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that they say usurps states' authority over their own water.

  • This new Salmonella ‘superbug’ is probably no scarier than the flu
    by Sara Chodosh on August 23, 2019 at 6:30 PM

    Superbugs sound scary now more than ever because they're increasingly real. Our widespread use of antibiotics is actively breeding hardier bacteria that can evade our best weapons against them. But if you're concerned about the 'super' strain of Salmonella enterica that's making the headlines, here's some comforting news: there's no 'super' Salmonella lurking out there that's impervious to all our drugs. But there probably will be soon.

  • Inexpensive chef knives that will change the way you cook
    by PopSci Commerce Team on August 23, 2019 at 5:30 PM

    Great chef's knives with sharp blades that won't cut into your savings.

  • Does Hyundai's rooftop solar panel change the fuel-economy equation?
    by Rob Verger on August 23, 2019 at 5:29 PM

    The new hybrid Hyundai Sonata isn’t available yet in the US, but it offers something compelling enough to make headlines here—a solar panel on its roof.

  • This rat is foiling developers' plans to capitalize on a weaker Endangered Species Act
    on August 23, 2019 at 4:37 PM

    Southern California developers have long sought relief from regulations protecting wildlife, and earlier this month the Trump administration obliged, formally moving to weaken the federal Endangered Species Act.

  • The West is trading water for cash. The water is running out
    on August 23, 2019 at 4:27 PM

    When it comes to global warming's one-two punch of inundation and drought, the presence of too much water has had the most impact on U.S. agriculture this year, with farmers across the Midwest swamped by flooding throughout the Mississippi Basin.

  • Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds
    on August 23, 2019 at 4:26 PM

    Tissue engineers create artificial organs and tissues that can be used to develop and test new drugs, repair damaged tissue and even replace entire organs in the human body. However, current fabrication methods limit their ability to produce free-form shapes and achieve high cell viability.

  • Keeping monkeys as pets is extraordinarily cruel–a ban is long overdue
    on August 23, 2019 at 3:53 PM

    Most people will have seen at least one headline over the last couple of years describing animal attacks on humans. This needn't include the elephant from a Zimbabwe National Park that trampled a tourist or the Sumatran tiger that killed a keeper who entered his zoo enclosure in Birmingham. There are numerous examples of attacks by wild pets on their owners, often whom they have known for years.

  • Breath! Respiring microbes generate more energy
    on August 23, 2019 at 3:50 PM

    How do cells generate and use energy? This question might seem simple, but the answer is far from simple. Furthermore, knowing how microbial cell factories consume energy and how proteins are allocated to do so is crucial when working with industrial fermentations.

  • Scientists use a new method to track pollution from cooking
    on August 23, 2019 at 3:48 PM

    Cooking organic aerosol (COA) is one of the most important primary sources of pollution in urban environments. There is growing evidence that exposure to cooking oil fumes is linked to lung cancer. Currently, the most effective method to identify and quantify COA is through positive matrix factorization of OA mass spectra from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements. However, for the widely used low mass resolution aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM), it is often challenging to separate […]

  • Laser-produced uranium plasma evolves into more complex species
    on August 23, 2019 at 3:48 PM

    When energy is added to uranium under pressure, it creates a shock wave, and even a tiny sample will be vaporized like a small explosion. By using smaller, controlled explosions, physicists can test on a microscale in a safe laboratory environment what could previously be tested only in larger, more dangerous experiments with bombs.

  • Save time using maths: Analytical tool designs corkscrew-shaped nano-antennae
    on August 23, 2019 at 3:18 PM

    The nanostructures from Katja Höflich's HZB team are shaped like corkscrews and made of silver. Mathematically, such a nano antenna can be regarded as an one-dimensional line that forms a helix, characterized by parameters such as diameter, length, number of turns per unit length, and handedness.

  • Researcher works to understand how gonorrhea develops resistance to antibiotics
    on August 23, 2019 at 3:07 PM

    Steadily and relentlessly, the bacterium that causes gonorrhea has slipped past medicine's defenses, acquiring resistance to once-reliable drugs, including penicillin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin. These former stalwarts are no longer used to treat the sexually transmitted disease.

  • Menstrual cups were invented in 1867. What took them so long to gain popularity?
    by Marion Renault on August 23, 2019 at 3:00 PM

    Today, people with periods can choose between dozens of menstrual cups—bell-shaped silicon containers, meant to capture blood during menses, available for purchase online or in-stores. Menstrual cups were one of the first technologies proposed as a solution to dealing with monthly periods. So why are they only catching on now?

  • Study models new method to accelerate nanoparticles
    on August 23, 2019 at 2:15 PM

    In a new study, researchers at the University of Illinois and the Missouri University of Science and Technology modeled a method to manipulate nanoparticles as an alternative mode of propulsion for tiny spacecraft that require very small levels of thrust.

  • You can stop bots and spammers from calling you so freaking much
    by David Nield on August 23, 2019 at 1:34 PM

    Your smartphone is a lot of things—a way to communicate with your loved ones, a tool to share your world, an occasional gaming console—but a vessel for ads and marketing campaigns should not be one of them.

  • Closing the attainment gap: Children need a place to excel and thrive
    on August 23, 2019 at 1:30 PM

    Recent statistics from The Education Policy Institute suggest it will take another 100 years to bridge the academic attainment gap between rich and poorer students in the UK. And according to the Sutton Trust, eight elite schools sent as many pupils to Oxbridge between 2015 and 2018 as three-quarters of all the state schools in the country.

  • Artificial trees capture new bird species on candid camera
    on August 23, 2019 at 1:20 PM

    An experiment from The Australian National University (ANU) using artificial trees has attracted birds and other wildlife never before seen in a damaged Canberra landscape—catching them on camera at the same time.

  • How to make influence from people in our networks a force for good
    on August 23, 2019 at 1:10 PM

    As the social and economic divides between groups grow ever wider, and social mobility declines, the bonds that tie people together, within families or communities, have weakened over time.

  • The nuclear mutant is still evolving
    by Eleanor Cummins on August 23, 2019 at 12:14 PM

    From the B-movies of the 1950s to the prestige dramas of the present, the nuclear mutant has played an important and ever-evolving role in our culture.

  • Caregivers of people with dementia are losing sleep
    on August 23, 2019 at 4:00 AM

    Caregivers of people with dementia lose between 2.5 to 3.5 hours of sleep weekly due to difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep -- a negative for themselves and potentially for those in their care, according to Baylor University research published in JAMA Network Open.

  • Who you see matters: Stroke patients benefit more from observing their own hand movements during therapy
    on August 23, 2019 at 4:00 AM

    Japanese scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have found that for stroke patients, observing their own hand movements in a video-assisted therapy -- as opposed to someone else's hand -- could enhance brain activity and speed up rehabilitation.